Posts Tagged ‘gun shooting training’

It’s A Whole New World

I grew up in an age of courtesy, men opened doors for women, I wore hats and gloves on Sunday, I didn’t eat dinner in front of the TV with my fingers.   It wasn’t all Donna Reed (if you don’t get the reference, you  are under 45).  No one had heard of the Sober Friend or Designated Driver, we didn’t wear helmets to ride bikes and sexist behavior was accepted and common. Recently I attended Shot Show in Las Vegas.  I was shocked that men stepped aside for me to get on the escalator, held doors, stood to one side…I commented on it and was reminded it wasn’t Vegas, it was that Read More »

The Glock 42

GLOCK 42

Glock introduced their single stack .380 compact pistol. I had to opportunity to see it at Shot Show in Las Vegas recently. I also had the chance to shoot it. Slightly larger than a Ruger LCP, it fit reasonably well in the hand, it is a small, but not tiny, gun. It shot smoothly, in true Glock fashion. While many expressed the wish that Glock would introduce a single stack 9mm, it appears that they felt the need to introduce a “pocket pistol” to meet the perceived market demand. While not my first choice for a carry gun, this was much easier to shoot than the Ruger LCP, and slightly Read More »

Do you carry?

1911 Handgun Style

Not like asking “are you a turtle?”, but a very serious question.  If you carry a firearm for self-defense, have you ever taken a handgun retention course?  There are several out there, some are more aggressive than others.  I had the opportunity to train with Kathy (The Cornered Cat) Jackson recently.  I came away convinced that if you carry you MUST have retention training. If you know a few basic moves you can significantly increase your odds of keeping your gun in a self-defense situation.  This isn’t training you can read and understand easily, this is physical, hands on, Read More »

PRECISION, ACCURACY AND KNOWLEDGE – An experience with Jonathan Wallace II of Native Executive Security

As a firearms instructor, one would think that I benefit from the range time and that I practice as much as I teach. Wrong. As all firearms instructors are aware, getting the trigger time necessary to maintain your very own discipline is very difficult due to teaching others to learn and maintain their own. On top of that, most of what I teach is handgun doctrine, causing my proficiency in other disciplines such as long range and tactical rifle, use of scope and the tactics thereof to sometimes fall short. Now this goes against my instructor ethics, because I believe that as good Read More »

Old School Fun – Smith and Wesson Model 41 .22LR, 5.5 inch heavy barrel

Smith and Wesson Model 41 .22LR, 5.5 inch heavy barrel

With the price and availability of ammunition at ridiculous levels, it falls to the lowly .22 caliber Long Rifle to satisfy the practice demands of a frustrated sporting public.  Pistol shooters have never had such a good selection of polymer framed revolvers and autoloaders in .22 to choose from.  But I like my pistols in steel and walnut, with hand-fitted parts and craftsmanship that companies can’t offer with today’s labor cost.  Let’s take a look at one of the best .22 handguns that Americahad to offer from the 2nd Golden Age of Firearms. I found this blued beauty sitting in Read More »

We Can All Breathe Easier

Heidi Yewman

Yep. Heidi Yewman has surrendered her firearm, or as she liked to call it…”weapon”.  Don’t know who Ms Yewman is?  She is an anti-gun activist who chronicled “My Month with a Gun”, starting in Ms Magazine and ending in The Daily Beast, Her stated intent was to show that she was able to get a permit and carry a gun without any training, and she did.  Putting herself, her family and all those around her in jeopardy by her reckless actions. She wrote of the fear, sitting in a Starbucks with a gun on her hip, and children nearby.  Later she wrote of leaving her gun in her purse Read More »

Handguns and High Heels

revolver 321

As a woman who shoots, it is amazing to me how often I hear “you don’t look like the type”.  Those of us who shoot came to it for our own reasons, some from fear, some for fun.  We come from all different backgrounds, professions and age groups.  We are young, old, short, tall, skinny, full figured, …  What we share is a love of the sport and often a strong sense that we are valuable and empowered.  We are smart, we are strong, and we enjoy having fun.  Many of us are professional women, educated, productive, and caring.  We are sisters, wives, moms... I have heard it so Read More »

Who’s in Your Safety Circle?

Road Cone with reflective bands

What is a safety circle? That is your personal perimeter, your “on guard” zone, no one should enter your safety circle without your awareness. The diameter of your circle may vary depending on your location, but a general rule of thumb is 21 feet, which is the distance an average person can close on you in about 2 seconds. For those of us who are challenged estimated feet, it is about two car lengths in any direction. You safety circle is especially important in public places like parking lots where so many bad things; robberies, car jacking, etc., can happen. Most people will pass Read More »

Gun Whisperer – You Have Questions, We Have Answers

handgun_043

Dear Gun Whisperer, Can you offer some suggestions on how I can relate better to female students in my gun classes?  It has gotten back to me that I’ve made some women uncomfortable, and I can’t see <expletive deleted> why, but that is what I’m told. Signed, F&%(*$*)% Great Instructor Dear Sir, First, profanity is often a substitute for a poor vocabulary, or a sign that you just don’t care.  Either way…Miss Manners would tell you to stop and so would I.  A gun class can be intimidating for someone who is new and it is helpful if the instructor comes across Read More »

Feet, not just for picking your teeth!

feet 02

Ok, bad joke, but it probably got your attention.  Feet are very much on my mind right now.  I recently discovered a new Safety Rule.  ALWAYS wear shoes when handling your firearms.  Some of you are thinking, “Duh” and some are wondering “why?”. Recently I was removing a Henry .22 rifle from its soft case (it was unloaded, cleared and cleaned) so I could put it in the safe.  It slipped.  I’ve been well trained not to grab my guns if they fall, let them go (you never know).  Well, it went, and landed on my foot.  My first thought was “I hope I didn’t damage the Read More »